© 2023 Kansas Public Radio

91.5 FM | KANU | Lawrence, Topeka, Kansas City
96.1 FM | K241AR | Lawrence (KPR2)
89.7 FM | KANH | Emporia
99.5 FM | K258BT | Manhattan
97.9 FM | K250AY | Manhattan (KPR2)
91.3 FM | KANV | Junction City, Olsburg
89.9 FM | K210CR | Atchison
90.3 FM | KANQ | Chanute

See the Coverage Map for more details

FCC On-line Public Inspection Files Sites:
KANU, KANH, KANV, KANQ

Questions about KPR's Public Inspection Files?
Contact General Manager Dan Skinner at skinner@ku.edu
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Is Free College Even a Good Idea?

Free college for everyone has become a campaign issue for some presidential contenders. Meanwhile, Kansas is following a nationwide trend where college enrollments are decreasing and technical school enrollments are increasing. Commentator John Richard Schrock suggests we may have reached -- or surpassed -- our college-able capacity.


Commentator John Richard Schrock is professor emeritus at Emporia State University, where he once taught aspiring students how to become biology teachers. Professor Schrock has also been a visiting teacher and lecturer in China since the mid-1970s. He lives in Emporia.

Schrock attended Indiana State University in Terre Haute, where tuition was $8 a semester hour in 1964, completing a bachelor's degree in biology teaching and a master's in science education. He began teaching in Kentucky before he graduated from I.S.U., and completed his degrees during summers. Schrock taught five years in Alexandria, Kentucky middle and high schools and two years at the I.S.U. Laboratory School before going overseas to teach at Hong Kong International School for three years. Schrock completed his Ph.D. in entomology working on insect ecology and systematics at the University of Kansas and, upon graduation, worked for the Association of Systematics Collections for three years. When the A.S.C. moved to Washington, DC, Schrock took the position at Emporia State University, directing biology teacher training. He was on the state biology committee and closely involved in the Kansas evolution debates of 1999. He writes a weekly Kansas newspaper column on education, produces public radio commentaries, and appears monthly on Kansas television.