LISTEN LIVE KPR - On Air: Listen Live to classical, jazz and NPR news Schedule LATEST
NEWSCAST
KPR 2 - On Air: Listen live to KPR's all talk-radio service, KPR2 Recordings

Share this page              

No NAFTA Deal: Canada-U.S. Talks To Resume Next Week

Canadian Minister of Foreign Affairs Chrystia Freeland speaks during negotiations for a new North American Free Trade Agreement in October.  "We know that a win-win-win agreement is within reach and that is what we are working toward," she said Friday.

Updated at 4:39 p.m. ET

After days of intense negotiations, the U.S. and Canada failed to agree on a deal by a Friday deadline to update the North American Free Trade Agreement.

But U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said that President Trump notified Congress of his intent to sign a trade agreement with Mexico "and Canada, if it is willing – 90 days from now."

Lighthizer said the talks with Canada were "constructive, and we made progress. Our officials are continuing to work toward agreement." U.S. trade officials will meet with their Canadian counterparts next Wednesday, he said.

Trump said he intends to enter into an agreement "in a timely manner, to meet the high standards for free, fair, and reciprocal trade," in a formal letter to Congress. Trump said the proposed deal would help American farmers through improved market access, create "a more level playing field" for American workers, and include tough labor and environmental rules.

In a news conference, Canadian Minister of Foreign Affairs Chrystia Freeland confirmed that the talks toward an agreement with all three countries would continue.

"We know that a win-win-win agreement is within reach and that is what we are working toward," she said. "We've made good progress, but there's still work to be done."

Canada rejoined NAFTA talks on Tuesday, a day after the U.S. and Mexico reached a deal tweaking the free trade agreement. Trump said he had a new name for that pact: the United States-Mexico Trade Agreement.

The White House had said a deal with Canada had to be reached by Friday, when it would send the Mexico agreement to Congress for a 90-day review required by law.

The new agreement would take over for NAFTA, the landmark pact reached in 1994. That deal was struck among three countries — Canada, the U.S. and Mexico — and removed many barriers to trade and investment among them.

Originally proposed by President Ronald Reagan, NAFTA was approved by Congress after lengthy negotiations and signed into law by President Bill Clinton.

Since the agreement took effect on Jan. 1, 1994, trade among the three countries has skyrocketed, and industries such as autos and trucks have flourished under elaborate supply chains that crisscross national borders tariff-free.

NPR's Jim Zarroli contributed to this story.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Tower Frequencies

91.5 FM KANU Lawrence, Topeka, Kansas City
96.1 FM K241AR Lawrence (KPR2)
89.7 FM KANH Emporia
99.5 FM K258BT Manhattan
97.9 FM K250AY Manhattan (KPR2)
91.3 FM  KANV Junction City, Olsburg
89.9 FM K210CR Atchison
90.3 FM KANQ Chanute

See the Coverage Map for more details

Contact Us

Kansas Public Radio
1120 West 11th Street
Lawrence, KS 66044
Download Map
785-864-4530 (Main Line)
888-577-5268 (Toll Free)
contact@kansaspublicradio.org