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The KPR Blog

Phil Wilke Tue, 05/26/2015 - 15:57

FROM KPR

17-Year Cicada Emerges with a Roar in Kansas

Something may soon be bugging you. Or at least bugging your ears. We've waited 17 years to tell you about it, but now we will. There's a new cicada in town and it's beginning to make a lot of racket. As a professor of biology with an interest in insects, Commentator John "Richard' Schrock never met a bug he didn't like. And he finds this critter absolutely fascinating.

Phil Wilke Tue, 05/26/2015 - 15:27

The annual Symphony at Sunset D-Day Commemoration Concert will be held Saturday, June 6 – the 71st Anniversary of D-Day – on the steps of the Eisenhower Presidential Library in Abilene.

Phil Wilke Fri, 05/22/2015 - 10:39

The Ruel Joyce Recitals feature Kansas City's best classical musicians direct from their performance venue of Johnson County Community College's Recital Hall in the Carlsen Center for the Performi

Phil Wilke Fri, 05/22/2015 - 10:11

Kansas Public Radio has a new smartphone app so you can take KPR with you everywhere you want to go.

The Shunga Trail along the Shunganunga Creek in Topeka. (Wikimedia Photo by  Mdupontmobile)
KPR Staff Fri, 05/22/2015 - 00:00

Q: Winding through the city of Topeka is a little river called the Shunganunga Creek. The name of this creek comes from an Indian word meaning what?


 

On May 25, 1986, the University of Kansas became the first university in the nation to dedicate one of these on campus. (Photo by J. Schafer)
KPR Staff Fri, 05/15/2015 - 00:00

On May 25, 1986, the University of Kansas became the first university in the nation to dedicate one of these on campus. What was dedicated?

Still in the game...c. 1913. (Photo via Library of Congress)
KPR Staff Fri, 05/08/2015 - 09:52

Q: Gambling halls and smoke-filled saloons with games of chance have been part of the Kansas landscape since our Wild West days.

The first grade class at State Street Elementary School, taught by Miss Hunt. It was taken in January 1955, shortly after Topeka elementary schools were racially integrated in the wake of the Supreme Court ruling in the Brown v. Board of Education case. Prior to this decision, which made segregated schools unconstitutional, State Street had been a school for white children only. (Photo Courtesy of Kansas Historical Society / kansasmemory.org)
KPR Staff Thu, 05/07/2015 - 00:00

In May 2014, StoryCorps Facilitators found themselves in Topeka, Kan., working with The Kansas Humanities Council for the 60th Anniversary of the landmark Brown v.

A worker bolts beams during construction of the Empire State Building in 1929; the Chrysler Building can be seen in the background. (Photo via Wikimedia)
KPR Staff Fri, 05/01/2015 - 00:00

Q: It was on this May Day - May 1, 1931 - that the Empire State Building was officially dedicated in New York City!

Figure 17: Mental Clutter, Pen & Ink - Matthew Lord
KPR Staff Tue, 04/28/2015 - 15:00

The latest in featured KPaRtists is the Thieves Guild, a collective that includes Kent Smith, Matthew Lord and Charlotte Pemberton. 

Phil Wilke Mon, 04/27/2015 - 14:25

The OK Mozart International Festival, June 6-13, is a multi-day festival that brings professional orchestra musicians, concert artists and musical performances of international significance to Bartlesville, Okla. This year celebrates the musical bounty of Italy: Respighi’s “Pines of Rome,” Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons,” Rachmaninoff’s “Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini” and performances of Mozart’s “Requiem” and “Don Giovanni.” Information and tickets are available on their website.

Phil Wilke Mon, 04/27/2015 - 13:28

When you call in your pledge to KPR, the phone volunteer will ask, among other things, “Do you have any comments for the staff?” Do you ever. Here is a small sample.
 

Sculptors from all over the country entered models in a competition conducted by the Treasury Department, Procurement Division, to select a design for a new five-cent coin to be known as the "Jefferson Nickel." Mrs. Nellie Tayloe Ross, (right) Director of the Mint, and Edward Bruce, Chief of Treasury Dept. Procurement Division, Section of Painting and Sculpture, look over a few of the 390 models entered. A prize of $1,000 was awarded to the winner, 4/20/38. (Photo via Library of Congress)
KPR Staff Fri, 04/24/2015 - 00:00

Q: America’s first female governor grew up in Kansas. In 1925, Nellie Ross became the nation’s first woman governor when she was elected to lead the state of Wyoming.

Phil Wilke Mon, 04/06/2015 - 10:36

Where do you listen to KPR? We want to know and we want to see!

Dwight David Eisenhower, President of the United States, brought to the presidency his prestige as commanding general of the victorious forces in Europe during World War II. Eisenhower obtained a truce in Korea and worked incessantly during his two terms to ease the tensions of the Cold War. (Date: Between 1953 and 1961) Photo Courtesy of Kansas Historical Society / kansasmemory.org)
KPR Staff Fri, 04/03/2015 - 00:00

Q: President Dwight Eisenhower, who grew up in Abilene, changed the nation in many significant ways.

(Photo by Kelsey Kimberlin/KU Marketing Communications)
Phil Wilke Fri, 03/27/2015 - 11:25

From KPR

Time for a Woman President?

Former Kansas Governor and U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius talks about women in politics and her own political career. Sebelius' talk kicked off "The First Woman President 2.0," this year's Presidential Lecture Series at KU's Dole Institute of Politics.

Phil Wilke Fri, 03/27/2015 - 10:32

Bowl For Kids’ Sake is Douglas County Big Brothers Big Sisters’ largest fundraiser of the year.

The final seconds of the third overtime in the 1957 final between North Carolina and Kansas. Wilt Chamberlain (13) has just rejected Tommy Kearns' (40) jumper. (Photo via KU University Archives)
KPR Staff Fri, 03/27/2015 - 00:00

Q: It’s been called the greatest college basketball game in NCAA tournament history: North Carolina’s triple-overtime victory over the Kansas Jayhawks in the 1957 championship gam

Dr. Don Potts (left) discussing his Louis Armstrong interview with KPR's David Basse. (Photo by Joanna Fewins)
Phil Wilke Wed, 03/25/2015 - 00:00

Louis "Satchmo" Armstrong and his band were on the KU campus for a concert on March 23, 1957. That same night, an hour to the east in Kansas City, Wilt Chamberlain and the Jayhawks were playing for the national title against the North Carolina Tar Heels. In an epic, triple-overtime game, KU lost to Carolina 54-53. A dejected KU team came back to Lawrence at 2:15 in the morning.
Who was there to greet them? Louis Armstrong. A young KU student had a tape recorder and he talked with the famous musician.

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